Patron -  Joanna Lumley, OBE

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Women's Economic Empowerment

 

http://penha.in-site-dev.co.uk/sites/default/files/uploads/manual/documents/Fadumo%20Aden%20milking%20her%20goats.jpgThe pastoral and agro-pastoral sector is heavily dependent upon the input from women – who are usually left out of the statistics which have so far been published. We work with partners to empower women and help to change attitudes to women’s participation in the economy and in public life.

Empowering Women via more effective combinations of interventions to bring a greater impact on a larger scale.
  1. We document and make public the contribution of women to their society;
  2. Build up the capacity of community based organisations that represent the needs and interests of women; and linking local women’s groups to marketing chain. More than 10 women’s groups with membership numbers ranging from 30 to 60 have been spontaneously formed in a number of districts from Kassala State of Sudan. Their numbers are still growing. Half of the groups have now been formally registered with the Humanitarian Affairs Commission.  
  3. Provision of micro-credit, business skills training for women’s groups and access to market information. In the past three years over 1,000 women from Somaliland, Sudan and Uganda have been trained in basic business skills as part of the Women's Economic Empowerment project funded by Danida.
  4. Training in specific skills for income generation (goat management, dressmaking/tailoring, milk processing/cheese making, horticulture and fruit growing, etc). Over 2007 and 2008, around 300 goats were distributed to more than 30 women’s groups in Uganda in the Masaka, Ssembabule, Nyabushozi and Kabale districts. In Uganda, women who received goat stock have been able to significantly increase their incomes, in some cases by 50 - 100%, with the bulk spent on medical expenses and school fees for children. 
  5. Women’s property and inheritance rights are, even where they are formally recognized, often denied by customary law.